19. The problem of conversion.

19. The problem of conversion.

Conversion

In linguistics, conversion, also called zero derivation, is a kind of word formation; specifically, it is the creation of a word from an existing word without any change in form. Conversion is more productive in some languages than in others; in English it is a fairly productive process.

Often a word of one lexical category (part of speech) is converted from a word of another lexical category; for example, the noun green in golf (referring to a putting-green) is derived ultimately from the adjective green. Conversions from adjectives to nouns and vice versa are 19. The problem of conversion. both very common and unnotable in English; much more remarked upon is verbing, the creation of a verb by a converting a noun or other word.

Among the main varieties of conversion are:

1.verbalization(the formation of verbs)

2.substantivation(the formation of nouns),e.g. a private(from private adj.)

3. Adjectivation(the form-n of adj-s),e.g. down(adj)(from down adverb)

4.adverbalization9the formation of adverbs)e.g. home(adv.)(from home n.)

The 2 categories of parts of speech especially affected by conversion are nouns & verbs.

It must be pointed out that the process of conversion 19. The problem of conversion. has some semantic limitations: a converted word only assumes one of the range of meanings of the original word. For example, the noun 'paper' has various meanings, such as "newspaper" (11), "material to wrap things" (12)... The denominal verb, though, only contains the sense of putting that material on places like walls. This shows the converted item has only converted part of the semantic field of the source item.

The two categories of parts of speech especially affected by conversion are nouns and verbs. Verbs made from nouns are the most numerous amongst the words produced by conversion: e. g. to hand, to 19. The problem of conversion. back, to face, to eye, to mouth, to nose, to dog, to wolf, to monkey, to can, to coal, to stage, to screen, to room, to floor, to blackmail, to blacklist, to honeymoon, and very many others.

Nouns are frequently made from verbs: do (e. g. This is the queerest do I've ever come across. Do — event, incident), go (e. g. He has still plenty of go at his age. Go — energy), make, run, find, catch, cut, walk, worry, show, move, etc.

Verbs can also be made from adjectives: to pale, to yellow, to cool, to grey 19. The problem of conversion., to rough (e. g. We decided to rough it in the tents as the weather was warm), etc.

Other parts of speech are not entirely unsusceptible to conversion as the following examples show: to down, to out (as in a newspaper heading Diplomatist Outed from Budapest), the ups and downs, the ins and outs, like, n, (as in the like of me and the like of you).

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Документ 19. The problem of conversion.